Behat + FuelPHP = RESTful Testing Happiness

If you’ve been following my recent posts, you know I’ve been working more lately with Behat for resting some REST services. In this post I showed you how to get things set up for some testing. In this post, I’ll show you how to use a custom class that I’ve put together to make a reusable system for testing REST.

For those that want to cut to the chase, I’ve posted some example code to github showing the code for the two different sides of the equation – the Behat testing and the PHP framework side (I went with FuelPHP because I was already familiar with it and it makes RESTful interfaces dead simple). The key is in the FeatureContextRest.php file that uses the Guzzle client to make the HTTP requests over to the framework. It provides some handy contexts that make it easy to create Scenarios.

So, still with me? Good – I’ll show you how to get my sample scripts installed so you can see my example in action. In the repository you’ll find two different directories – “fuel” and “behat”. In each you’ll find some files:

behat

  • features/index.features:
    An example set of Scenarios that use the REST testing contexts to create, find and deleting a “User” from the system
  • features/bootstrap/FeaturesContextRest.php:
    The key to the puzzle, the implementation of some context methods for use in Behat

fuelphp

  • fuelphp/classes:
    These are the example models and controllers you can drop into your Fuel install to have them “magically” work (with any recent version of the framework).

This is assuming you already have Behat installed and working and have set up FuelPHP on a host somwhere. For our example, we’ll just use “http://behat-test.localhost:8080″ Here’s what to do:

  1. Start by copying over the FeaturesContextRest.php file to the “features/bootstrap” directory of your Behat installation alongside the default FeaturesContext.php.
  2. Copy over the behat.yml configuration file into your testing root (the same level as the “features” directory) and update the base_url value for your hostname.
  3. Take the “classes” directory and copy over its contents to the location of your FuelPHP installation – if you’re familiar with the structure of the framework, this is simple…it just goes in “app/classes”.
  4. You’ll need a database to get this working, so you’ll need to get the FuelPHP ORM stuff configured and working in your install. Be sure to update your config.php to automatically load the “orm” module.
  5. Make a database for the project and use the init.sql to create the “users” table.
  6. To test and be sure our models/controllers are working right, hit your host in a browser, calling the “User” action like: “http://behat-test.localhost:8080/user”. This should call what’s in Controller_User::get_index(). It’ll probably just return an empty result though, since there’s nothing for it to pull.
  7. To use the FeaturesContextRest.php, be sure that you include that file into your default FeaturesContext.php file and that your class “extends FeaturesContextRest”.

So, if all has gone well, you have all the pieces in place to get started. Let’s start with a sample Scenario to show you how it all works:

[code]
Scenario: Creating a new User
Given that I want to make a new "User"
And that its "name" is "Chris"
When I request "/user/index.json"
Then the response is JSON
And the response has a "userId" property
And the type of the "userId" property is numeric
Then the response status code should be 200
[/code]

If you’ve used Mink in the past, so of this will seem familiar. This doesn’t use Mink, however, and I’ve opted to use Guzzle as the client for the backend to replace some of the browser interactions. Really, we don’t need all of the fancy interface interaction Mink gives, so this streamlined interface is more useful.

In this example, we’re creating a user with a property “name” of “Chris” and sending that off to the “/user/index.json” endpoint. A few tests are included like: checking the response code, seeing if the return value has a “userId” property, etc. If all went well and the user was created (this is a POST, so it calls “post_index” in the controller), this test should pass with flying colors….green, hopefully. :)

The key is in the phrases “to make a new” (POST), “to find a” (GET) and “to delete a” (DELETE) to tell the tests which verb to use.

Hopefully this library will be useful to some folks out there – I’m going to be improving it as I work on more tests for some current projects to ensure better quality of the software.

3 comments

  1. The FeatureContextRest class doesn’t seem to have anything specifically to do with Fuel. Is there any reason the same code couldn’t be used to test any REST API from any framework?

  2. Just a couple of quick notes. I had to install guzzle through composer as well as install the pecl_http extension to get this working. I built my api with Laravel and everything works. Something I am playing with is refactoring FeatureContextRest into a sub context which would allow for easier integration into most projects. Thanks for the nod in the right direction for this.

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